Music Genres – aaaaaugh!

Mind-boggling. One wouldn’t think so but trying to pigeonhole your music into the proper genre is maddening. There are too many.

 

I grew up listening to Led Zeppelin, Queen, Slade – all the greats, which I considered ‘rock’led-zeppelin bands and, in my ’20’s, after music school,  then went through a huge ‘folk’ phase, listening to mostly Donovan but throwingDonovan at the Hollywood Bowl some Nick Drake, Don McLean, Dave Van Ronk, although he may be considered to be a part of the phase of my life in my ’30’s when I went through a ‘blues’ phase, including such notables as Sonny and Brownie, Sonny Rhodes, (whom I met at the King Eddy in Calgary one night),  and, of course, many others.

 

All along the way, Led Zeppelin was really the soundtrack of my life, (thank God for bootlegs – 9 studio albums gets old pretty quick!), but I always listened to the Raspberries, Rod Stewart, Fleetwood Mac, the old, middle and new formations, (the middle one, with Bob Welch is the one I consider the best – check out the link to their great songs Come A Little Bit Closer and Future Games).  Always listening to rock, folk and blues. I have always thought genres are pretty easy to figure out.

 

So, when it comes time to releasing an album, you must slot yourself into, first, a main and then a secondary, genre. For my second album, Snow Wonder, it was pretty easy – Christmas – done. For my first album, the easy choice was “Instrumental”, however, that doesn’t tell you too much. It could just as easily be instrumental of the 500 violins, (aaaah Summer Place by Percy Faith and his Orchestra – great tune) or of the The Great Gig in the Sky from Dark Side of the Moon.fleet

 

The logo from my first album!
 

I broke down the 12 songs from Slideways into the genres I believe they fall into, excluding the instrumental category:

Downtown – Outta Town – pop, country

Drake/In Flight – adult comtemporary, avant garde, new age

New Horizon – easy listening, blues

Thinking Twice – pop, epic pop, sophisti-pop

Too Bad – blues

Collaboration – pop, adult contemporary

Urban Hop – folk, contemporary

Wyatt Café – blues, ’50’s electric blues

Dey Ha’ T’ Go – blues, blues-rock

Blues Riff in E – blues

Fire – psychedelic rock, stoner

Waterfall – pop, easy listening, folk

 

If this is accurate, I guess the album would be classified as a blues album since that is the majority category. You would have a hard time convincing any bluesman worth his chops, however, that Urban Hop is a blues song.

Starting+Over

Being a spatial, as opposed to a linear, thinker, I find these labels exasperating at best and vexing at worst but I do see the need for them. Some system of organizational flow chart is needed. But, c’mon, how many bloody genres do we need. Check out this link about genres from Wikipedia.

 

 

I counted close to 300 and that only includes folk, rock, pop, blues, easy listening headings, It excludes ska, country, electronic, hip hop, jazz, and R and B. Wow.

 

As I continue to record music, I find myself having an internal debate about what the best way to release the series of songs I am working on. At the moment there are 22 songs in various stages of completion. Some of them are quite clearly blues songs, whether long or short or multi-versioned. Others are nice little pop songs. Some are brooding ballads, (I’ll have a blog about this coming up soon!), while others are more difficult to classify.

 

I suppose I could fit them all onto one album but that solution creates many issues, the least of which is that if a pop song is released onto a blues album, the listener expecting to hear blues will be miffed because there is a non-blues song on the album, and the pop listener will have a shallower life for not having heard the pop song lost on a blues album.

 

The solution? A series of singles? Nah. That would involve too much time spent on marketing.

 

A series of EP’s? This is the direction toward which I am leaning.

 

That way, I can release three to six songs on a blues EP and they all fit the description, just as all the pop songs will fit on the Pop EP.

 

Once the songs are complete, you can spend a little time working on all the various components of marketing and playing the songs and then follow it up with another album in short order.

 

And it is slowly dawning on me that the day of the album is doomed. People will buy songs, usually the hits, and move on so they can create a play-list, the current embodiment of the ’80’s mixed tape. And iTunes even has a “genius’ that will mix it for you so you don’t have to spend too much time bothering with your music. Let a machine do it. Bah!

 

In the spring of 2012, as I watched the hockey play-offs, there was a Lexus commercial thatSMALLL-Watson-K-T-c813398f24v2 had this great song as the background music. I did a little research and found out the song was by a North Carolina singer named Kristina Train. I checked out her website, listened to a bunch of her music and ended up buying the whole damn album. She has a great voice.

 

If this is out of step with modern sensibility, then to Hell with modern sensibility. I bought the whole album of someone who, half an hour previously, I had never heard of and I loved it. And this is what I usually do. I would rather listen to great but obscure music. I suppose that is what I record too. Too bad most people never hear it.